All _Perspectives

07/31/2017 _Perspective

Visualizing Law’s Pluralities

Artistic Practice and Legal Culture

The interrogation of the cultural construction and negotiation of legal practices in the conference Law’s Pluralities: Cultures/Narratives/Images/Genders (Giessen, Germany, 2015) offered a stimulating occasion for the presentation of pertinent artistic works. The international artistic positions by Il-Jin Choi, Raul Gschrey, Mi You, and Manu Luksch reflect upon social and legal frameworks, and demonstrate means to visualize phenomena that often remain abstract. The artistic interventions themselves are also productive: through their explorations, contestations, and subversions, they participate in an alternative production of knowledge; they mediate and shape legal practices.

11/30/2016 _Perspective

Aesthetic Experience

Visual Culture as the Masterpiece of Nonhumanity

This essay proposes a reflection on aesthetic experiences and their implications on the nonhuman for the study of culture. It focuses on visual culture as one of the representative means for a life of coexistence. In the present day, images search for an agreement with innovation as the new reality of culture. However, the life experiences offered by the digital world are being realized through the new senses offered by the media. Therefore, can today’s realities of visual culture be considered nonhuman?

11/30/2016 _Perspective

Non-Human Actors and Identity Performance Online

In 2014, Bruno Latour began his keynote speech at the Digital Humanities Conference in Lausanne by describing several fallacies typical of the discourse in the digital domain.[1] He started with the cloud effect fallacy, a tendency to construct the digital as a non-substantial, ephemeral field, whereas in reality, it has a strong material component. As an example, he stated the vast electricity consumption of Google’s data centers: according to the reports of the New York Times, they continually consume as much electricity as a city with 200,000 households. [2]
The discussion around two anti-terrorist laws that were recently passed in Russia became a further illustration of this fallacy. Named after their creator Irina Yarovaya, the so-called “Yarovaya package” featured, among other things, a change in the law “On Communication,” which made it obligatory for mobile operators to store on Russian territory information on the exchange of messages and calls between users for three years, and the contents of the exchanges for a period up to six months beginning in July 2018.

05/30/2016 _Perspective

New Narrative Forms in the Digital Age

The Emergence of Enhanced E-Books

Since its rise at the end of the 17th and the beginning of the 18th century, the novel has continually responded to historical, cultural, and media influences. In the first decade of the 21st century, emerging technologies such as e-readers, iPads, and tablets have entered the book market and threaten to undermine the status of the printed book at large. Will we be reading electronic books on digital devices or is the printed novel still up-to-date? Umberto Eco and Jean Claude Carrière have already discussed whether the printed book will disappear and finally die as a result of the Internet in a volume whose title is symptomatic of the whole debate: This is Not the End of the Book: A Conversation Curated by Jean-Philippe de Tonnac.

05/30/2016 _Perspective

The Wisdom of Crowds

Emergence can be defined as a network effect, and it is little wonder that the concept plays a vital role in the theory of net-based media art. The aim of this essay is to show that emergence can also be observed in research processes, even when the scholarly aspect might, at first glance, not be readily apparent.
Crowdsourcing is often introduced in situations of scholarly need where huge amounts of data have to be processed and where the task is too great for unavailable specialists. In order to proceed, the problems must be subdivided in smaller parts, so that they can be approached even by laypersons. This can prove difficult; at other times, it is relatively simple.